3370 N Hayden Rd Ste #123-411, Scottsdale, Arizona 85251

Fallen Partners

A Celebration of Life

In Memory of our Fallen Partners

In loving Memory
June 20th, 2013

K-9 Ronin

Officer Wez Zygmont

Glendale Police Department

Glendale, AZ

Ronin

June 20th, 2013

Glendale Police Department

On June 20th, 2013 Officer Wes Zygmont and his canine partner Ronin responded to assist patrol with locating a suspect who fled on foot from officers and recently just committed an armed robbery. While establishing a search team, officers received information that the suspect was running through backyards and was possibly armed.

Officer Wes Zygmont began a search with Ronin and narrowed the suspect’s location to a backyard. As officers were clearing the backyard, Ronin located the suspect hiding underneath an in ground trampoline. Ronin bit the suspect and while officers were attempting to take him into custody, the suspect produced a handgun. As Ronin was biting the suspect, Officer Wes Zygmont attempted to gain control of the handgun; however the suspect was able to fire. The rounds struck Officer Wes Zygmont in the hand and foot and one round fatally wounded Ronin. Officers were able to return fire and mortally wounded the suspect.

Officers later learned the suspect was lying in a position of advantage underneath the trampoline waiting to ambush approaching officers. Officer Wes Zygmont and Ronin recently just completed an academy and this was his first actual apprehension.

In loving Memory
December 12th, 2012

K-9 Ivan

Officer Chris Fenoglio

Tucson Police Department

Tucson, AZ

Ivan

December 12th, 2012

Tucson Police Department

A man suspected in a carjacking and a Tucson police dog were shot and killed late Wednesday. The incident began when a man called 911 at 10:47 p.m. to report that a gunman had stolen his pickup truck outside a Domino’s Pizza. Minutes later a patrol officer spotted the truck and attempted to pull it over. Instead, the driver led the officer on a chase. The man continued driving even after crashing into a fence. After pulling into an alleyway, the driver got out of the truck and fled on foot. He was chased by several officers and the police dog. A confrontation in a front yard of a house resulted in the shooting. Police said Thursday afternoon that the man held a large-caliber gun up to his head. At that time, Ivan bit the man on the arm and the man shot and killed Ivan, Tucson police said. Officers told the man to drop his gun, but he refused. He was fatally shot. The alleged carjacker was pronounced dead at the scene. Ivan died at a veterinary hospital. The entire incident took just eight minutes.

In loving Memory
July 1st, 2008

K-9 Baloo

Officer John Holdinsky

Tempe Police Department

Tempe, AZ

Baloo

July 1st, 2008

Tempe Police Department

Officer John Holdinsky has served the Tempe Police Department for 22 years. His partner, K-9 Baloo, was a patrol-trained and narcotics-trained police dog. K-9 Baloo ws purchased in 2004 by the Tempe Police Department, at a cost of $6,500.00. His training, along with that of his handler, cost an additional $20,000.00.

On the evening of June 30th, 2008, Officer John Holdinsky and K-9 Baloo, responded to a suspicious activity call at 18:30hrs., near the Farmer Street Lofts Project. Police already on scene had learned that two male suspects were possibly attempting to steal copper. Suspects were last seen running into the fenced in Farmer Street Lofts Project, which is under construction at 450 S. Farmer Ave., near University Drive and Mill Avenue.

Officer Holdinsky and K-9 Baloo began to search the area for the suspects. During the search, K-9 Baloo was on the roof and unable to navigate it correctly, resulting in his falling over 40 feet to the ground below. K-9 Baloo survived the fall and was found by officers, lying on his stomach, unable to move. He was then rushed to the First Regional Animal Hospital.

Veterinarians worked valiantly through the night trying to save K-9 Baloo. It was determined that K-9 Baloo had suffered massive spinal and internal injuries during the steep fall. K-9 Baloo passed away at 2:15 in the morning on July 1st, with his handler, Officer John Holdinsky and his wife, Carol, and members of the Tempe K-9 Unit at his side.

K-9 Baloo is missed by his handler and his family, who he resided with when he wasn't on duty, members of the Tempe K-9 Unit, and by members of the Tempe Police Department.

In loving Memory
August 20th, 2007

K-9 Rico

Officer Keith Duckett

Arizona Dept. of Public Safety

Tucson, AZ

Rico

August 20th, 2007

Arizona Department of Public Safety

Arizona Department of Public Safety Officer Keith Duckett, and his 7 year old K-9 Partner, Rico, completed 10 weeks of K-9 Training before being assigned to duty in the southern part of Arizona, patrolling the interstate highway including drug interdiction duties. K-9 Rico had been assigned to the K-9 Unit for 4 years.

On the evening of August 20th, 2007, at approximately 19:10 hours, Officer Duckett observed a Chevrolet pickup truck speeding excessively in the vicinity of mile marker 287, on Interstate 10, just outside of Benson, Arizona. Officer Duckett then turned on his emergency lights and attempted to pull the speeding vehicle over. Instead of pulling over to the side of the interstate, the speeding vehicle proceeded to accelerate even more with Officer Duckett now close behind in a brief pursuit of the fleeing vehicle that lasted approximately three miles, with the suspect driver now leaving the interstate and crashing the vehicle on the side of the roadway, who then exited the vehicle along with the passenger and began to run away. Officer Duckett inspected the suspect vehicle and noticed a large quantity of marijuana in the rear of the truck, at which time both he and K-9 Rico engaged in a foot pursuit of the fleeing suspects. Officer Duckett caught up to and apprehended one of the suspects, at which time he then noticed that K-9 Rico was no longer in sight. For some unknown reason, K-9 Rico became distracted and instinctively returned to the DPS patrol vehicle. At some point after this the second suspect was taken into custody, while K-9 Rico ran out onto Interstate 10, where he was fatally injured by a tractor and trailer. The two suspects were identified as illegal aliens from Mexico and were booked into the Pima County jail on suspicion of transportation of marijuana, possession of marijuana and possession of marijuana for sale. The amount of marijuana being transported by the suspects weighed in at 967 pounds.

During his 4 years with the DPS K-9 Unit, K-9 Rico has been responsible for the seizure of nearly 68,000 pounds of marijuana, 5 pounds of heroin, 86 pounds of cocaine, 95 pounds of methamphetamine and close to One Million Dollars in U.S. Currency, in addition to the apprehension of several suspects.

During his 4 years with the DPS K-9 Unit, K-9 Rico has been responsible for the seizure of nearly 68,000 pounds of marijuana, 5 pounds of heroin, 86 pounds of cocaine, 95 pounds of methamphetamine and close to One Million Dollars in U.S. Currency, in addition to the apprehension of several suspects.

K-9 Rico is remembered for his courageousness and dedication to his K-9 Duties. He is missed by his handler and his family, whom he resided with when he wasn't on duty, members of the Arizona Department of Public Safety's K-9 Unit, and by members of the Arizona Department of Public Safety.

In loving Memory
March 20th, 2007

K-9 Leon

Officer John Lafontaine

Mesa Police Department

Mesa, AZ

Leon

March 20th, 2007

Mesa Police Department

Mesa Police Officer and K-9 Handler, John Lafontaine, has been with the Mesa Police Department for approximately 13 years. He has been with the Mesa Police Department's K-9 Unit for over 6 years. Officer Lafontaine and his K-9 partner, Leon, a 3 year old Belgian Malinois originally from the Netherlands and acquired by the K-9 Unit in January of 2006 from Adlerhorst Kennels, located in Riverside, California, completed the Basic Handlers Course at the Mesa Police K-9 Unit's training facility. K-9 Leon and his handler were then certified by the National Police Canine Association and ready to patrol the streets of Mesa, in addition to assisting various units of the department such as the Patrol and SWAT divisions when called upon, as well as assisting other police departments in the area when requested.

On April 8th & 9th of 2006, Officer Lafontaine and K-9 Leon, participated in several events at the 4th Annual Desert Dog Police K-9 Trials, held at Mesa's Hohokam Stadium that year. The K-9 Team helped the K-9 Unit win 6th Place for Top Agency in the Patrol Category. Quite an accomplishment for a team who only began working the streets just a short time before the K-9 Trials. 2006 was also the first year for the "Tough Dog" competition, which was held at the conclusion of the K-9 Trials. Only the ten best hard hitting dogs were chosen by the Agitators to participate in the event, with K-9 Leon being one of the chosen ten.

In the afternoon of August 18th, 2006, Officer Lafontaine and K-9 Leon, made national headlines. Off duty at the time and resting at home, Officer Lafontaine and K-9 Leon were called upon to assist with the apprehension of a suspect who was in a standoff with Mesa Police Officers on the 60 Freeway, with a box over his hand, giving the appearance that he could possibly be holding some sort of a weapon. Officers on the scene exercised great care and restraint so as not to escalate the situation, especially since there was a 3 month old infant in the suspect's vehicle, where the interior temperature was rising due to afternoon summertime temperatures exceeding 110 degrees. The suspect, originally stopped in another location in Mesa for expired tags and fearing arrest for two outstanding felony warrants, sped off in his vehicle before the officer could take him into custody. The suspect was kept under surveillance by one of the Mesa Police Department's Helicopter Air Units, with police vehicles falling back so as not to endanger the public or the occupants of the vehicle. The suspect stopped on the 60 Freeway, pushing an adult female passenger from the vehicle and continued westbound until wrecking his vehicle and thus disabling it. The 350 pound male suspect was then given numerous chances to surrender. Having failed to do so and with the officers on the scene realizing that the infant in the vehicle could be in distress, K-9 Leon was deployed on the suspect. K-9 Leon grabbed the suspect's left arm and held on while the suspect lifted K-9 Leon up off the ground and swung him around in the air from side to side. While K-9 Leon was attempting to bring the suspect down, other officers were busy making entry through the right rear passenger door of the disabled vehicle, to rescue the infant who was face down and in respiratory distress. Never releasing his hold on the suspect's arm at anytime until his handler gave the release command, K-9 Leon brought the suspect down on top of himself, with the suspect partly landing in the driver's seat of the disabled vehicle and K-9 Leon disappearing from view as the overhead TV News Helicopters captured the event as it unfolded on live television. The infant was rushed to the hospital and made a full recovery. The suspect was taken into custody, transported to a hospital for treatment of his injuries and later booked at the Maricopa County Jail, where he is currently awaiting trial on multiple charges. As for K-9 Leon, people from the community were so concerned for his health and safety that after witnessing what had happened on live TV and later on in the day on the evening news, they began calling the Mesa Police Department to express their concern for K-9 Leon and wanted to know if he was injured and how he was doing. Officer Lafontaine and K-9 Leon granted television and newspaper interviews a few days later, to show all the concerned citizens that K-9 Leon was doing just fine and came out of the incident unscathed. K-9 Leon and Officer LaFontaine were later awarded the National Deployment of the Year Award for this freeway hostage incident, by the National Police Canine Association.

In the early morning hours of November 2nd, 2006, a year long rash of ATM thefts in the east valley came to an end. Officer Lafontaine and K-9 Leon responded to a request for assistance call by the patrol division, who was setting up a perimeter to locate suspects who had fled on foot from a vehicle that was spotted by a Mesa Patrol Officer, in the vicinity of Signal Butte and Madero roads. The suspect vehicle was towing a trailer containing a bank Automatic Teller Machine (ATM), just stolen from the M&I Thunderbird Bank branch, located on Baseline and Crimson roads, triggering an automated panic call by the bank to the Mesa Police Department. The suspects had used a stolen fork lift from a nearby construction site to remove the ATM, which was then loaded onto a stolen trailer being towed by a vehicle belonging to one of the suspects. Officers were able to locate one of the suspects hiding between two air conditioners. After the suspect refused numerous requests to comply with orders by the Police, K-9 Leon was deployed by his handler to flush the suspect out into the open. After the suspect attempted to fight with K-9 Leon, he was subdued and taken into Police custody, then transported to a local hospital for treatment of his injuries. Detectives were able to locate the second suspect who was also taken into custody.

On March 20th, 2007, at approximately 22:15 hours, Officer Lafontaine detained a suspicious person on a bike in the K-Mart Parking Lot, located on the northwest corner of Lindsay Road and Main Street, in Mesa. Upon learning that the 19 year old detained subject was wanted on outstanding warrants for burglary and a probation violation, Officer Lafontaine attempted to take the suspect into custody with the suspect resisting arrest. The suspect assaulted Officer Lafontaine by throwing his bicycle at him, then proceeded to run south in the parking lot towards Main Street. Officer Lafontaine then deployed K-9 Leon to apprehend the fleeing suspect, who continued to run south through the parking lot and then proceeded to cross the street. K-9 Leon continued on in pursuit of the suspect and as he ran south across Main Street, he was struck by a car. Officer Lafontaine rushed over to his K-9 partner, placed him in his vehicle and proceeded to rush him to the veterinarian hospital, where K-9 Leon was pronounced dead on arrival. The suspect was later apprehended by Mesa Police Officers. In addition to being booked on the outstanding warrants, the suspect was also booked on suspicion of aggravated assault, resisting arrest and false reporting.

K-9 Leon is remembered not only for his courageousness and his agility, but also for his playful spirit. He is missed by his handler and his family, whom he resided with when he wasn't on duty, members of the Mesa K-9 Unit and by members of the Mesa Police Department.

In loving Memory
May 28th, 2006

K-9 Miko

Officer Gary Schad

Tucson Police Department

Tucson, AZ

Miko

May 28th, 2006

Tucson Police Department

Officer Gary Schad has been a member of the Tucson Police Department for 19 years. He formerly was a member of the SWAT team, the Bike unit and Undercover. He has been a K-9 Handler for 10 years and is the current unit trainer. His partner's name was Miko. K-9 Miko was a 3 year old German Shepherd who specialized in patrol and narcotic detection. K-9 Miko liked to spend his off time chasing around Officer Schad's horses.

On May 28th, 2006, Officer Schad and K-9 Miko were hot on the trail of a suspected carjacker. K-9 Miko was deployed to catch the suspect who had bailed on foot. K-9 Miko pursued the suspected carjacker, who then jumped from an overpass at Kino and Aviation Parkways with K-9 Miko following. While the suspect was able to get away, K-9 Miko took a 30-foot-fall, breaking his back, shattering a leg and suffering neurological damage. He was euthanized as a result of his injuries. K-9 Miko has been cremated and his handler, Officer Gary Schad, said he, his wife and their 11-year-old son will decide in about a year where to spread his ashes.

A memorial service honoring Tucson's fallen hero, K-9 Miko, was held on May 14th, 2006, at Reid Park in Tucson. Present at the services were the Commanders from the Tucson Police Department, numerous K-9 Officers and representatives from Valley Animal Hospital and other animal organizations, who spoke at the ceremony. A tree planting ceremony also took place to honor K-9 Miko.

In loving Memory
November 2005

K-9 Rocky

Deputy Raja Karim

Mohave County S.O.

Mohave County, AZ

Rocky

November 2005

Mohave County Sheriff's Office

Raja Karim has been employed with the Mohave County Sheriff's Office since 2002. Deputy Karim and K-9 partner "Rocky" were assigned to the Kingman-Golden Valley area. Deputy Karim and "Rocky" had worked together since 2004, after receiving training from Zauberger K-9 Academy in Arizona. Deputy Karim is also a Field Training Officer.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Rocky (Big Rock). Rocky died during surgery for a broken leg. There was a freak accident during a training session when after a building search in a two story building Deputy Karim and Rocky were leaving the building. They were walking down the stairs when Rocky suddenly started to howl and hold up his right leg. There were no signs of injury during the scenario and Rocky had a great bite. Deputy Karim attended to Rocky and took him to the vet. It was determined that he had a broken leg and surgery was needed. Rocky passed away during the surgery. Rocky will be greatly missed by his family, the Mohave County Sheriff's Office, and all that knew and loved him.

In loving Memory
August 13th, 2005

K-9 RJ

Officer Bryan Hanania

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix, AZ

RJ

August 13th, 2005

Phoenix Police Department

On Saturday August 13th, 2005, at approximately 1830 hours, several officers from the Central City Precinct were pursuing a suspect for armed robbery. Officer Bryan Hanania and his police service dog R.J., were trying to apprehend the suspect after he fled from his vehicle on foot in the neighborhood of 2100 East Garfield. Officer Hanania and other officers chased the suspect into an alley where the suspect had reacquired his vehicle. As the officers were in the alley, the suspect drove rapidly in their direction. The suspect appeared to intentionally drive toward R.J. and struck the K-9 with his vehicle. The officers were able to avoid being struck by the car and the suspect was eventually apprehended by other officers.

Officers immediately transported R.J. to an emergency clinic where he was diagnosed with critical injuries to include a broken spine. R.J. was euthanized as his injuries were determined to be insurmountable.

R.J. was a three year old Belgium Malinois who was with Officer Hanania and the Phoenix Police Department's Canine Unit as a team for 18 months. Officer Hanania and R.J. have deployed over three hundred times to assist officers in locating dangerous suspects and/or illegal narcotics.

In loving Memory
February 2005

K-9 Yari

Officer Ed Perez

Tohono O'odham Police Dept.

Sells, AZ

Yari

2005

Tohono O'odham Police Department

Officer Ed Perez of the Tohono O'odham Police Department, lost his partner Yari. While Officer Perez had his vehicle sitting in the parking lot of their station, the AC malfunctioned. Yari has been with the K-9 unit since 2000.

Among his many achievements were 1st place narcotics detection 2001 Tucson area K-9 Trials. His largest marijuana load was 1800 lbs, the smallest amount found was one seed under the rear seat of a vehicle. Yari had detected over 20,000 lbs of marijuana on traffic stops. Within the last month, Yari had three marijuana loads and an alert on a false bed for Border patrol that yielded 571 lbs of cocaine. Yari also had eight patrol apprehensions.

He a was an asset to the Tohono O'odham Police Department K-9 Unit and will be missed by Officer Perez, his family and the K-9 Unit.

In loving Memory
July 22nd, 2004

K-9 Rex

Officer Kris Guffey

Avondale Police Department

Avondale, AZ

Rex

July 22nd, 2004

Avondale Police Department

On July 22nd, 2004 the Avondale Police Department Canine Unit was doing an in-service. While doing a scenario, K-9 Rex received a laceration to the top of his nose.

Upon arrival at the Emergency Animal Clinic, Rex was checked out and the vet determined that the wound would need sutures. Blood samples were taken from Rex for testing. All blood tests came back good. Rex was administered anesthesia so that the wound could be sutured.

During the surgery Rex stopped breathing. The animal clinic staff immediately started CPR and worked on Rex for a long time. Unfortunately resuscitation efforts were unsuccessful.

Rex was with the Avondale Police Department and handler Officer Kris Guffey for five years and will be missed deeply.

K-9 Rex was an eight year old Belgian Malinois. Officer Guffey had been serving on the Avondale Police Department for fifteen years and has been a K-9 handler for eight years at the time of Rex's passing. Rex and Officer Guffey were a team for five years. They were assigned to the Patrol Division and S.W.A.T. Division. Rex was trained in narcotics detection, area searches, building searches, criminal apprehension and handler protection. Officer Guffey is the K-9 Instructor/Trainer for the department's K-9 Unit. Rex will be greatly missed by his partner, his family, and the Avondale Police Department. Officer Guffey continues his career with the Department.

In loving Memory
July 20th, 2004

K-9 Rico

Deputy Rodney Hamilton

Pima County Sheriff's Office

Tucson, AZ

Rico

July 20th, 2004

Pima County Sheriff's Office

Deputy Rodney Hamilton and K-9 "Rico" assisted on a search for a suspect that fled from deputies during a pursuit in the area of Green Valley, AZ. The suspect had bailed from a stolen motorcycle and fled on foot in the desert. After 4-5 minutes of searching, K-9 "Rico" gives a strong alert. Deputy Hamilton deploys his partner. Rico headed off into the brush. After a minute or so the deputies hear a loud thump near the freeway. A passing vehicle struck Rico. It appeared that the suspect had doubled back and crossed the freeway with Rico not far behind him. Rico passed away at the scene.

This picture of Rico was taken about a week before his passing. These are pictures of the front and back of a card that was created by a civilian and sent to Deputy Rodney Hamilton, Rico's handler. Rico will be greatly missed by Deputy Hamilton, his family, and the Pima County Sheriff's Office.

In loving Memory
October 2001

K-9 Hugo

Officer Bart Massey

Arizona D.P.S.

AZ

Hugo

October 2001

Arizona Department of Public Safety

Officer Bart Massey was attending an EOD training class for his department. He left his K-9 partner "Hugo" in the vehicle with the air conditioning running. After approximately 40 minutes, Officer Massey returned to his vehicle to check on his partner. Officer Massey discovered that the air conditioner had malfunctioned and stopped running. Hugo died in the vehicle apparently of heat stroke.

In loving Memory
August 12th, 1999

K-9 Ringo

Officer Chris Hemmen

Arizona D.P.S.

AZ

Ringo

August 12th, 1999

Arizona Department of Public Safety

Officer Chris Hemmen let his K-9 partner "Ringo" out for a break off leash along State Route 77, near Winslow, Arizona. Ringo ran out into the highway and was struck by a semi truck.

In loving Memory
July 7th, 1996

K-9 Jos

Officer Mike Thomas

U. of AZ. Police Department

Safford, AZ

Jos

July 7th, 1996

University of Arizona Police Department

Jos was one of the first two Police service canines obtained by the University of Arizona Police Department in March of 1991. The two canines were imported from Holland where they had received KNPV certification. Jos had worked briefly with Dutch Police and military units after his certification and was accustomed to flying in helicopters. For several years after joining UAPD, he would stop whatever he was doing and stare at any helicopter or small plane passing overhead. Both dogs completed handler/canine training in California and were placed into service at UAPD in the spring of 1991 as patrol dogs.

Within a few months, Jos was certified by the NNDDA (National Narcotics Detector Dog Association), for narcotic detection and recognized as being patrol/drug detection capable by the University of Arizona Risk Management Department.

Jos proved to be a very capable narcotic detector canine for UAPD as well as other local area city, state and federal Law Enforcement agencies. He frequently assisted US Postal Inspectors in checking suspicious packages and was routinely requested to respond to the Tucson International Airport to check incoming and outgoing baggage and packages by various agencies. Because Jos and his handler, Officer Mike Thomas, worked primarily days, he was frequently used for narcotic detection by area agencies when no other dogs were on duty.

Jos was accountable for detecting hundreds of pounds of narcotics and several hundred thousands of dollars in cash. Several automobiles and other properties were additionally seized under the RICO statues during his career.

Jos became a local celebrity at the annual University student run "Spring Fling" carnival held each spring on campus. The annual four-day event attracted crowds of 50,000 people over the four days. Although his attendance at this event was billed officially as narcotic detection and crowd control, he quickly won the hearts of people young and old as the public relations "King" of the department. Each year after four days of being talked to, made over, having his picture taken hundreds of times and being patted for hours on end, Jos would go home with "sore" fur from all the petting not to mention sticky fur from candy, sodas and the ever present cotton candy.

At the beginning of each semester, when new students arrived, the department went to fraternities, sororities and residence halls to present its dog and pony show - minus the pony. And yes, Jos became the focal point and the favorite of these also. He got loads of pats and hugs from students who had to leave their dogs at home and who unofficially adopted him. There was hardly ever a time when Jos was out patrolling the campus that some student, staff or faculty wouldn't call his name and rush to him for a pat or hug. The story around campus would always be the same as one person could be overheard telling another "That's Jos, our dog and what's his name, his handler".

On one memorable occasion, a DPS (Department of Public Safety) Officer who had stopped a semi on Interstate - 10, suspected drugs and called upon Jos to search the semi. Jos responded and found drugs all right, but despite several baths afterwards, smelled like a tomato for nearly two weeks following that search. The semi was loaded with freshly picked tomatoes.

During the latter half of his career Jos enjoyed working on Mt. Graham in the middle of the Coronado National Forest in southeast Arizona where the elevation is 10,500 feet, with cool summers and winters with lots of snow which dogs love. He spent his time working at the Mount Graham International Observatory where he provided detection and deterrence against the numerous opponents of the University of Arizona's telescope project. One could quickly tell by watching him that he truly enjoyed "making his presence known" during the many anti-scope demonstrations and civil disobedience attempts staged by groups such as Earth First. It was there the Jos refined his skills at "scenting" and detecting persons trying to hide in the woods. Many of those detected and arrested were surprised to learn that just because a dog can't see you doesn't mean he can't smell you.

Jos continued being part of the best of both worlds - the action of the city and the enjoyment of the mountain until his career came to a premature end when he was 8 1/2 years old.

At the request of another agency, Jos was performing a narcotic search in a home after Officers had done a preliminary search, made an arrest and confiscated drugs. During the search, Jos gave a strong alert to the cabinet under the kitchen sink. Being advised by other Officers that no drugs had been noticed, his handler opened the cabinet when Jos immediately started sniffing. Observing materials used for making meth, Officer Thomas quickly stopped Jos and removed him from the area. Unfortunately, as discovered shortly after, the damage had been done. Jos had inhaled caustic fumes that led to respiratory distress and complicating problems, which were beyond veterinary specialists abilities to correct.

Jos was euthanized on July 7th, 1996, resulting from his injuries.

Officer Mike Thomas continues his career with the University of Arizona Police Department as the Commander for the Mount Graham International Observatory.

In loving Memory
April 17th, 1996

K-9 Hunter

Officer Jeff Kozel

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix, AZ

Hunter

April 17th, 1996

Phoenix Police Department

On April 17th, 1996 just prior to 2:04 a.m., Patrol Officers D. Defatte and A. Carlin, were engaged in a traffic stop at 30th Street and Cactus, when they were advised by a citizen of a subject with a gun nearby. The officers located this subject who appeared to be carrying a rifle case and attempted to contact him. The subject, later identified as Jackson James Doss, W/M, DOB 12-15-71, ran from the officers to the houses on the south side of Cactus Road.

As Officer Defatte, still in his vehicle, attempted to follow Doss to maintain sight of him, Doss fired numerous rounds at him with a semi-automatic 9mm handgun. Five of the rounds struck Officer Defatte's police vehicle. Officer Defatte was not injured.

Doss ran into the yards of houses immediate to the area to elude capture. A police perimeter was quickly established. After the initial shots were fired, the resident at 2929 E. Cactus called 9-1-1 advising there was a subject with a gun in his backyard. Officers evacuated the residents and surrounded the house while Officer Kozel and K-9 Hunter responded to the rear yard. At approximately 2:25 a.m., Hunter was released off-lead after alerting to Doss in the backyard. Doss had by this time armed himself with the rifle he was carrying, a mini-14 carbine which fires a .223 caliber bullet. Hunter located Doss in the backyard, but was shot five times by Doss at point blank range. Doss then fired several more times at the arcadia glass door so that entry could be made into the house. Hunter was able to bite Doss in the hand before returning to his handler, Officer Jeff Kozel. Hunter was obviously critically wounded. While other officers continued the surveillance of the residence, Hunter was transported for medical treatment.

Just prior to 8:00 a.m., Doss, who had forced entry into the residence at 2929 E. Cactus, surrendered to S.A.U. officers. He was treated for numerous cuts to his arms and hand. He was charged with numerous felonies resulting from this incident. When interviewed, Doss invoked after telling investigators that he was under the influence of methamphetamines.

Hunter did not survive his injuries. He is credited with preventing serious injury and/or death to the officers immediate to the area for Doss' capture.

Hunter's value to the Department will be missed. Hunter was put in service on October 23rd, 1991. His primary function was to apprehend major felony offenders. Recently, Hunter was certified as a narcotic canine. In his career with the Department, Hunter was responsible for 686 searches and 94 felony arrests. He was able to find several crime scenes and pieces of evidence that would have been difficult for investigators to find. It is next to impossible to ascertain how many injuries and/or lives were spared because of Hunter.

There are several highlights to Hunter's career. One of the most memorable is the finding and capture of the suspect responsible for the gunning down of two Phoenix Police officers on June 30th, 1992. These two officers are Dave Logan and Marla Wasser. Both of these officers suffered permanent physical injuries. Dave Logan will never return to full duty.

Hunter is the first canine to receive the Canine Medal of Valor.

Officer Jeff Kozel is currently a handler in the unit with a Belgian Malinois named “Doc”.

In loving Memory
November 17th, 1994

K-9 Bruno

Bullhead City Police Department

Bullhead City, AZ

Bruno

November 17th, 1994

Bullhead City Police Department

On November 17, 1994, at 4:40 PM, Officer Sonny O’Hara of the Bullhead City Police Department contacted a suspect wanted for questioning in a local pawn shop burglary. Approximately 50 handguns were stolen in the burglary. As Officer O’Hara was searching the suspect, he discovered “nunchuks” concealed in the suspect’s waistband. O’Hara attempted to place the suspect under arrest for the concealed weapon when a struggle ensued. The suspect broke free from O’Hara and fled through the community park on foot.

Officer O’Hara released K-9 Bruno from his patrol vehicle and ordered Bruno to apprehend the fleeing suspect. The suspect turned and ran across State Route 95 with Bruno in pursuit. As Bruno crossed the highway, about to apprehend the suspect, he was struck by a passing motorist who did not see him coming. Officer O’Hara rushed to Bruno’s aid as a passing off-duty officer, seeing what had just happened, stopped to give chase.

Torn between leaving his fallen partner and fearing for the safety of his fellow officer, Officer O’Hara was forced to leave Bruno in the care of the off-duty officer’s wife to continue the pursuit. Bullhead City Fire Department paramedics responded immediately from a nearby station and provided emergency care for Bruno. The paramedics transported Bruno to the department’s veterinary hospital where he was pronounced dead on arrival due to massive internal injuries.

After an extended foot pursuit and assistance from witnesses, the suspect was found hiding in a dumpster. He was ordered out of the dumpster but refused. As Officer O’Hara attempted to pull the suspect out of the dumpster, a struggle ensued. The suspect attempted to flee again at which time OC spray was used to subdue him. The suspect was transported the hospital, treated and released for minor injuries and later booked. He was charged with cruelty to animals; interference with a working/service animal, carrying a concealed weapon and two counts of resisting arrest.

Bruno was a beautiful dog with a smoky, blue-grey color and was loved by all. He was practically still a puppy when he joined the force at 14 months old. Although small in stature, he was fast. His nick name was “The Mala-Rocket.” If memory serves, he was clocked at over 35 miles per hour in the very same park where he gave his life protecting his partner and the citizens of Bullhead City. The suspect, along with nine other defendants, was later charged with burglary, theft and multiple counts of trafficking in stolen property for the pawn shop break-in.

In loving Memory
October 20th,1994

K-9 Dax

Officer Ben Boyer

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix, AZ

Dax

October 20th,1994

Phoenix Police Department

On October 20th, 1994, Officer Ben Boyer responded to 1721 W. Carson to assist the Phoenix Police Department Special Assignments Unit with the apprehension of homicide suspect barricaded in his home. Dax was deployed to locate the suspect in the residence and was shot by the suspect using a 12-gauge shotgun. The suspect later shot at and injured two SAU officers. The suspect ultimately died of injuries sustained during the shooting with police. Officer Ben Boyer is currently in the unit and serves as the Master Trainer with a Belgian Malinois named “Falco”.

In loving Memory
1987

K-9 Ado

Deputy Mark Kentera

Maricopa County S. O.

AZ

Ado

1987

Maricopa County Sheriff's Office

Ado and Officer Kentera had just completed training with Pat Beltz at the K-9 Academy in Palm Springs, California, which Ralph Pendergast also went through to be a trainer. After graduation that summer, Ado and Officer Kentera were assigned to Assist Lake Patrol and work the Canyon and Apache Lakes area from 1600-2400 hours. The day of Ado's death, Officer Kentera arrived at the Canyon lake aid station for briefing and to finish paperwork, leaving Ado in the patrol vehicle parked under the carport in the shade with the hood up and AC on. After returning to the vehicle Officer Kentera found Ado down and barely breathing. He got him out of the blazer and called for help. A nurse at the aid station came out and they dumped water on him and she started an IV. Jerry Foster, KTVK Channel 3's helicopter pilot at the time, was at the Saguaro Lake aid station and offered to fly them to the vet. He flew over to Canyon lake, picked them up and flew to a vet in Scottsdale where they got Ado stabilized and transferred him to their regular vet the next day where he died from complications from the heat stroke.

Back then their patrol vehicles didn't have a cage or heat alarms for the interior. Ado got up to the front seat area, maybe while barking at someone and shut the AC off. Even with the truck in the shade and the window slightly open the heat was too much. From this incident covers were put over the AC controls and the vehicles were equipped with heat alarms/pagers.

In loving Memory
November 21st, 1986

K-9 Murph

Officer Carlos Araiza

Tempe Police Department

Tempe, AZ

Murph

November 21st, 1986

Tempe Police Department

On November 21st, 1986, an armed suspect who had shot a Scottsdale Police Officer and injured several other citizens in Scottsdale, fled into Tempe.

Officer David Lewis pursued the suspect even though his patrol car had been struck by gunfire. During the pursuit, the suspect kidnapped six year old Robbie Hughes as he was walking home from Meyer School, and held him hostage inside the home at 1254 E. Malibu .

At one point in the confrontation, circumstances made it necessary for Sgt. Tranter to enter the home to attempt the rescue of the little boy. Upon entering the house, Sgt. Tranter was shot in the face with a Glaser round, which is a fragmenting type of bullet. He was unable to immediately return fire because he was unaware of the location of the hostage. Once it was determined that Robbie was in another part of the house and away from the suspect, Sgt. Tranter returned his fire and located Robbie. He was unable to call for help and notify other officers of the location of the boy due to his radio, which was mounted on his shoulder, was struck with a .44 Caliber round fired by the suspect. In spite of being wounded at the outset and continuously being fired upon, Sgt. Tranter was able to drag the hostage to safety.

Immediately after Robbie's rescue, Officer Carlos Araiza sent his police dog, Murph, into the home to confront the suspect while other members of the tactical team forced entry through the front door. Murph was shot by the suspect and later died of his wounds.

Officers Les Gray, Gary Lindberg and Tom Stubbs, entered the dark home through the front door. A few moments later, Officer Gray encountered the suspect in a hallway. The suspect fired one round from a handgun which struck Officer Gray in the right hand and right bicep. Officer gray returned fire, striking the suspect in the chest. The suspect died from his wounds.

All officers who participated in this operation demonstrated courage and dedication far beyond the call of duty. Robbie Hughes was not hurt and was returned safely home, but the success of this operation was not without cost. Sgt. Tranter lost his right eye in the confrontation. Officer Gray recovered from his wounds and returned to work, however the members of the Tempe Police Department experienced a deep sense of loss with the death of police service dog, Murph.

Murph was obtained from the Phoenix Police Department in February of 1981. Officer Carlos Araiza was assigned as his handler in June of 1982. During their time together, the two participated in 336 building searches, 348 area searches, 24 narcotic searches and arrested 45 felony suspects. They also participated in countless hours of training which prepared them for incidents like the one which occurred on November 21st. Officer Araiza and Murph had received 8 departmental commendations during their assignment together, and while Murph gave his life during this operation, in doing so, he provided officers the opportunity to gain entry and resolve an extremely hazardous situation. Murph will be remembered by the citizens of Tempe and by his friends in the Police profession with fondness and appreciation.

In loving Memory
1986

K-9 Yeager

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix, AZ

Yeager

1986

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix PD K-9 Yeager was lost in 1986, when he jumped off a second floor landing during a training exercise and fractured his spine.

In loving Memory
July 13th, 1984

K-9 Roscoe

Officer Jeff Fenton

Phoenix Police Department

Phoenix, AZ

Roscoe

July 13th, 1984

Phoenix Police Department

On Friday July 13th, 1984, Officer Jeff Fenton stopped a drunk driver. Officer Fenton attempted to take the driver into custody when a struggle began. Roscoe jumped out of the patrol car to assist Officer Fenton. Officer Fenton took control of the suspect with Roscoe's assistance and ordered him back to the patrol car when Roscoe was struck by passing car. Roscoe was obtained by Officer Jeff Fenton when he was eight months old prior to being assigned to the K-9 Unit. When Officer Fenton was assigned to the K-9 Unit, he advised the Master Trainer he had a German Shepherd that might be suitable for work in the unit. Roscoe was tested and accepted into the unit. Roscoe performed in the unit as a patrol and explosives detection canine. Officer Fenton continued in the unit and returned as a sergeant prior to retiring.

In loving Memory
1977

K-9 Sam

Deputy Garland Moore

Maricopa County S. O.

AZ

Sam

1977

Maricopa County S. O.

MCSO Deputy Garland Moore, lost his K9 Sam in 1977. K9 Sam was poisoned while in the backyard of his residence. The suspect(s) knew that Sam was a police dog due to the Sheriff's vehicle being parked out in front of the house.

In loving Memory
November 23rd, 1974

K-9 Woo

Officer James Richards

Tucson Police Department

Tucson, AZ

Woo

November 23rd, 1974

Tucson Police Department

Police Dog Woo was lost during an east side burglary call when he was struck by a patrol car arriving on the scene. Woo was struck at East Speedway and North Holly Ave. K-9 Handler Officer James Richards had dropped Woo's leash to let him cool off after he had searched in vain for a burglar near the intersection.

Woo, a German Shepherd, was one of eight dogs used in tracking, bomb detection and burglary searches.

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